Troy Dentures and Partial Dentures

Dentures and Partial Dentures Troy, NY

You have probably heard about partial and full dentures as treatments for tooth loss. If you are now facing this problem and want to do something about your smile, these are great solutions. Living with missing teeth can make things difficult for eating, but it can also affect your self-esteem. Dentures and partial dentures are practical solutions to restore mouth function and help patients enjoy smiling once again.

Dentures and partial dentures are available at Matthew J. Clemente, DDS in Troy and the surrounding area. Our staff can evaluate your condition and determine which option is the right fit for you. Whether you are missing a few teeth, several teeth, or all your teeth, dentures may provide the relief you have been anticipating. Because our professionals have the necessary knowledge and training, you can feel at ease knowing we can set you on the path to a beautiful smile.

Call our office today at (518) 599-7523 so you can make an appointment.

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Reasons to Consider Getting Dentures

The need for tooth replacement can arise for a variety of reasons. Some people lose teeth due to a traumatic injury or an illness such as diabetes. Others develop problems with their teeth to the point where a dentist may recommend extraction. Whatever the cause, dentures offer several benefits as a tooth replacement option:

  • Ability to continue eating a regular diet
  • Confidence in your appearance
  • Clear speech
  • Oral health

Dentures and partial dentures can provide an effective solution for many problems missing teeth can cause. Leaving gaps can promote bacterial growth, which can lead to cavities in the remaining teeth, gum disease, and infections. Neighboring teeth can also become weaker from the lack of structural support on the side of the gap.

Many people also have concerns about their appearance. Even when the missing teeth are closer to the back and not immediately visible when a person smiles, they can affect facial muscle tone over time. According to an article on dental health and headaches by the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain, the muscle strain from a missing tooth can cause ongoing headaches.

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How Dentures Are Made

Dentures consist of a flesh-colored base and the synthetic teeth attached to it. Today, both components are made of a type of acrylic. The artificial teeth are typically made of acrylic resin, which closely approximates the appearance of real teeth.

Once the decision is made to proceed with dentures, the patient will make an appointment for the impression. The dentist will put a tray with a thick paste into the patient's mouth to take impressions of the upper and lower teeth. This process usually takes about 20 seconds for each impression. The dentist may offer to apply a numbing agent to the palate beforehand to minimize discomfort.

Afterward, the impressions are used to make a plaster model of the mouth. The dental lab technician then uses wax to attach the teeth. The wax is shaped and trimmed according to the patient's gum shape.

Then the wax shape with attached teeth is placed in a container, sometimes called a flask. Dental stone or plaster is poured around to hold it. The wax is then boiled out, leaving a molding in the shape of the gums, and the acrylic material for the dentures' base is poured in.

The denture is removed from the container, trimmed and polished. At this point, the patient will have the first fitting. While some people may find their dentures fit properly right away, most need to have a few adjustments done for optimal comfort.

It is normal to need several fitting appointments before the dentures fit the way they should. Patients should not hesitate to let the dentist know if something feels wrong. What may seem like a trivial amount of discomfort during fitting can seriously interfere with your quality of life, later on, so be sure to speak up.

Types of Dentures

There are several basic types of dentures. The right option for you can depend on several factors, which Matthew J. Clemente, DDS can discuss with you. Choosing an option that works for you can help you get the most out of the dentures.

Dentures can be full or partial. A full set can be necessary for patients who are missing all their teeth. In this case, impressions will be taken of the gums and the teeth made to maintain the proportions and distances similar to the real teeth. A partial set can be an option if the patient still has several teeth in good condition remaining.

Additionally, there are also fully removable and bridge-supported dentures. Removable dentures are what most people picture: the base that sits on the gums with attached teeth. They can be easily taken out. While this option is typically more affordable, removable dentures may need several adjustments over the years as the mouth's shape changes.

Bridge-supported dentures are also removable but do not have a base. They are clipped on to four or six dental implants. These implants are small titanium posts that are surgically inserted into the jawbone. Eventually, the implants fuse with the bone.

Due to the implants, bridge-supported dentures tend to be more costly than other options. They also involve minor surgery. However, many people find they feel more secure and are more comfortable because they do not need a base. The implant procedure can also reduce future bone loss, which can be familiar with missing teeth.

Not all patients are good candidates for fixed dentures. Those who already suffer extensive bone loss may not have enough bone to support the implants. Some other health concerns can also prevent implants from being a good option.

Options Other Than Dentures and Partial Dentures

Dentures have been improved in design for over a hundred years. Today they are a viable option for patients of all ages, whether one tooth needs to be replaced or many. At Matthew J. Clemente, DDS, we can advise patients on when this treatment would suit their oral health needs. At our office, we can also advise you on other options for replacing missing teeth. Each type of tooth replacement has distinguishing qualities. There are two primary categories of tooth replacement other than dentures:

  • Dental implants. These are artificial teeth similar in look and feel to natural teeth. They have roots made with screws that are inserted into the jaw for stability. Implants are highly durable with the capacity to last a lifetime with proper care.
  • Dental bridge. A bridge closes the space left by missing teeth; hence, why they are referred to as “bridges.” Bridges are held in place by either natural teeth or implants with artificial teeth bridging the space and two or more crowns placed over the teeth and connected to an artificial tooth.

Helping Dentures Last With Proper Care

Dentures can work effectively for up to 10 years. This time frame will depend mainly on the person’s commitment and diligence to maintaining the appliance. Just as patients should brush and floss natural teeth, people must do the same with dentures. These habits will help prevent and remove stains from artificial teeth, helping to preserve the color.

Each night, patients should remove the dentures and soak the appliance in a solution that we recommend to help clean the dentures. After every meal, the wearer should take out the dentures and rinse them off. When doing this, the person must be careful not to drop the appliance. It may be helpful to place a towel on the counter or in the sink.

Dentures should allow the person to eat most foods without any issues. However, the patient should be careful about chewing hard items such as candy, nuts, and ice. Sticky foods can also pull the dentures out of the person’s mouth. If the person notices any damage to the base or artificial teeth, they should contact our office right away.

People should not try to fix the dentures without professional assistance. An article on the American Dental Association website offers more information on the subject of maintaining dentures and what to do if the break. In all cases of the dentures sustaining damage, it is crucial to call us for repairs.

Common Myths and Misconceptions

One of the most common myths we hear about dentures is that once a patient gets their dentures created and placed, they are set for life. Remember that dentures typically last for 5-10 years. Since this is a wide span of years, patients may wonder how to know when they need new dentures. If the color has changed dramatically or there is physical damage, dentures may need replacement. The most telling sign, however, is when they no longer fit securely.

Some people may also believe that if they remove all their teeth and get full dentures, they’ll never need to set foot in a dentist’s office again. The truth is that dentists are in the best position to tell patients whether or not they need to get their dentures repaired or replaced. In fact, the dentist may adjust dentures during annual or bi-annual visits to keep them fitting correctly. Dentists also pay keen attention to gum health. If the patient smokes or suffers from illnesses that may affect the gums, this is even more important.

Definition of Denture Terminology
Alveolar Bone
The alveolar bone is the bone surrounding the root of the tooth that keeps the tooth in place.
Clasp
A clasp is a device that holds a removable partial denture prosthesis to the teeth.
Denture Base
The denture base is the part of the denture that connects the artificial teeth with the soft tissue of the gums.
Edentulous
Edentulous is a term that applies to people who do not have any teeth.
Periodontal Disease
Periodontal disease is a condition that causes inflammation of the gingival tissues and membrane of the teeth, leading to tooth loss without professional treatment.
Pontic
Pontic is another term for an artificial tooth on a fixed partial denture.
Rebase
Rebase is the process of refitting denture prosthesis by replacing the base material.
Reline
Reline is when a professional resurfaces the surface of the prosthesis with a new base material.
Resin/Acrylic
Resin and Acrylic are resinous materials that can be components in a denture base.
Stomatitis
Stomatitis is the inflammation of the tissue that is underlying a denture that does not fit properly. It can also result from other oral health factors.

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